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Back from several weeks' rest, we're back live on Thursday, January 14, at 4:00 pm US-EDT with a new episode of Reinventing School on Learning Revolution.
 

This time, we're trying something new. We're looking at the whole chain of education from Tennessee's Commissioner of Education, Penny Schwinn to Chief K-12 Impact Officer Dr. Sharon Roberts and Dr. Lisa Coons, Chief Academic Officerto Director for the Upper Cumberland Region Janice Fox to Director of Lauderdale County Schools Shawn Kimble and Director of Hamilton County Schools Dr. Bryan Johnson, Putnam County first grade teacher Sarah Vaughan, and a student from Hamilton County. Also: Dr. Ellen McIntyre, Dean, College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

8420789488?profile=RESIZE_400xDr. Penny Schwinn was sworn in as Tennessee’s education commissioner on February 1, 2019. As commissioner, Dr. Schwinn is committed to building on Tennessee’s momentum over the last decade and plans to continue to accelerate growth through excellence in achievement, empowerment of students and teachers, and engagement of all stakeholders. Coming from a family of educators and committed to increasing access to an excellent education for all children, Commissioner Schwinn began her work as a high school history and economics teacher in Baltimore. Her early career also includes experience as a new teacher coach in south Los Angeles and time in the private sector, where she supervised work in operations, marketing, and information management. Prior to joining the Tennessee Department of Education, Commissioner Schwinn served as the Chief Deputy Commissioner of Academics at the Texas Education Agency. Commissioner Schwinn also previously served in other state and district roles as an Assistant Secretary of Education in the Delaware Department of Education and as Assistant Superintendent of Performance Management for the Sacramento City Unified School District. She is also the founder and former superintendent of Capitol Collegiate Academy, at the time one of the county’s highest-performing charter schools serving low-income students from a region of Sacramento where she grew up.  She also served as an elected Trustee for the Sacramento County Board of Education. Commissioner Schwinn earned her Bachelor of Arts from the University of California-Berkeley, her Master of Arts in Teaching from Johns Hopkins University, and her Ph.D. in Education Policy from Claremont Graduate University in California. She is the proud parent of two daughters in Tennessee public schools, and a son not yet school age.

 

 

8447836656?profile=RESIZE_400xDr. Lisa Coons is Chief Academic Officer for the State of Tennessee. She was born into a family of educators, including her father and aunts, who served as high school teachers. After graduating from Wright State University, Lisa taught high school English in both rural and urban districts in central Ohio. She continued her education by earning a Master’s Degree in educational technology, a principal’s license, a superintendent’s license, and a curriculum and instruction license. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Coons has continued to advocate for children who have socio-economic barriers while focusing on developing teacher capacity and growing high-quality leaders to provide equitable opportunities for all children. Lisa was honored to serve Nashville children, teachers, and leaders as the Executive Officer for the Schools of Innovation. Dr. Coons returned to the Tennessee Department of Education in August 2019 and now serves as the Chief Academic Officer. Within this role, she oversees statewide academic programming from birth to high school.

8420795859?profile=RESIZE_400xSharon Roberts leverages deep expertise, experience, and credibility in K-12 to provide thought leadership across teams and activate key relationships in the field to drive impact in Tennessee. Prior to joining SCORE in 2012, Sharon served as Director of the Lebanon Special School District. She began her career in education as a special education teacher in the Grainger County School System. Sharon worked for more than 21 years in the Knox County School System where she served as a special education teacher, middle school science and reading teacher, instructional coach, principal, Assistant Superintendent for Supplementary Student Services, and Assistant Superintendent for Administrative Services. She currently serves on several boards that further the cause of professional learning for educators, including the Learning Forward Foundation, Learning Forward Tennessee, and the Association of Independent and Municipal Schools (AIMS) Evaluation System of Tennessee. Sharon is a native of Knoxville and received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

 

8420797857?profile=RESIZE_400xEllen McIntyre has served as the Dean of the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences at the University of Tennessee for one year.  Prior to this role, McIntyre served in administrative roles at UNC Charlotte and North Carolina State University, and as a professor and university scholar at the University of Louisville.  She is also a former elementary classroom teacher.  Ellen’s scholarly work has focused on elementary reading instruction, especially for students who have struggled in school.  Her most recent work has focused on redesigning educator preparation programs so teachers are prepared to teach in any setting.

 

8420798671?profile=RESIZE_400xJanice Fox, CORE (Centers of Regional Excellence) Director for Upper Cumberland Region. About CORE: The Tennessee Department of Education has eight regional field offices, called CORE Offices, that are charged with providing differentiated, academic support to school districts within their given region. The CORE offices are part of Tennessee’s statewide system of support and work closely with districts that have priority schools, focus schools, and other Title I schools in need. CORE’s mission is to empower Tennessee school districts to build educator capacity through targeted, differentiated academic support resulting in student readiness. To do this, each CORE office is staffed with an executive director and a variety of academic consultants including individuals who specialize in ELA, math, data analysis, teacher and principal evaluation, intervention, CTE, and school nutrition.

 

8420793264?profile=RESIZE_400xDr. Bryan Johnson, a native of Nashville and a proud product of public schools, has dedicated his career to public education, serving as a teacher, school administrator, director of secondary schools, chief academic officer, and now as the Superintendent of Schools in Hamilton County Schools, Tennessee. He holds degrees from Austin Peay State University, Belmont University, and Trevecca University, where he earned his doctorate in educational leadership. During Dr. Johnson’s tenure, Hamilton County Schools have shown historic levels of improvement. In the last three years, the district moved from 130th to 2nd in the state for student academic growth, making Hamilton County Schools the fastest improving school district in Tennessee. Some of the academic improvements include increasing the number of Reward Schools (state’s highest distinction) from 5 to 32, increasing scholarship dollars earned from $20 million to more than $100 million, increases in achievement for high school assessed subjects by 7% or more and an increase of 4.5% in the number of Black, Hispanic and Native American students scoring proficient on state assessments. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Johnson worked with community leaders and the school board to launch a 10-year commitment to providing high-speed internet to all 28,500 economically disadvantaged students in Hamilton County for free in an effort to close the digital divide. Dr. Johnson has received numerous accolades for his leadership, including being named 2021 Tennessee Superintendent of the Year and 2020 EdWeek Leader To Learn From. He was listed as a Superintendent to Watch by the National School Public Relations Association (NSPRA), Outstanding Young Alumnus at Austin Peay, and Humanitarian of the Year for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Southeastern Region.

 

8420799482?profile=RESIZE_400xShawn Kimble, Director of Lauderdale County SchoolsAbout Lauderdale County Schools: Lauderdale County Schools is committed to a culture of high expectations for all students and staff. The district's core values guide this commitment. We Value: -The academic achievement and social development of all children. -An environment conducive to learning - clean, safe, respectful, and positive. -The involvement of parents in the education of their children. -Quality teachers and administrators who are competent, passionate, and put children first. -Accountability in all things and the use of sound, accurate data in decision-making.

 

8420800686?profile=RESIZE_400xSarah Vaughn, a first-grade teacher at Putnam County Schools. Sarah earned her Bachelor's Degree at Tennessee Technological University.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 33: The Role of the State, Part 3

 
On Thursday, December 17 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the 31st LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

When we produced Episode 25 (below), we found state leadership in at least two U.S. states to be remarkably forward-thinking and open-minded about school, so we continued with a similar discussion with Episode 31. We continue today. This was intriguing because so much of what teachers and school districts discuss are the requirements of the state. Time to look at several other states, and so this week, we visit with leadership from Tennessee and Georgia. 

We'll be joined by Jillian Balow, Wyoming Superintendent of Public Instruction; and Richard Woods, Georgia State School Superintendent.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

8299936864?profile=RESIZE_400xJillian Balow is serving a second term as Wyoming’s elected State Superintendent. She oversees education in the state, and as one of Wyoming’s five elected constitutional officers, Jillian sits on the State Loan and Investment Board and the State Board of Land Commissioners. Jillian is a fifth-generation Wyoming native. She taught in Wyoming classrooms for 10 years and has worked to support Wyoming children and families her entire career.  She has an undergraduate degree in education from the University of Wyoming and a master’s degree in education from Regis University. In addition to teaching, Jillian has consulted in the private sector, served as an administrator at both the Wyoming Department of Family Services, and was a policy advisor to Governor Matt Mead. A mother of two, Jillian’s daughter, Paiton, is 20 and is an active duty specialist in the Army. Her son Jack is 15. Her husband, John, is an elementary school principal. Jillian is the President of the Board of Directors for the Council of Chief State School Officers, the professional association of state education heads from across the nation. During her tenure, she worked with tribal partners to enact “Indian Education for All” so that all Wyoming students learn about the history and contributions of the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone Tribes. She also developed a support system for Wyoming’s lowest-performing schools. In three years, the number of schools requiring assistance has decreased by 5%. She holds true to the belief that small government is best and reduced in-agency personnel by 11% and agency operating funds by 15% while maintaining an optimal capacity, before 2020 reductions. Jillian overhauled the state standards review process to be the most collaborative and transparent in the nation.

 

8299947480?profile=RESIZE_400xRichard Woods is the State School Superintendent of the Georgia Department of Education and is a member of the Homeland Security Board. He was born in Pensacola, Florida and while growing up in a military family, lived in California, Hawaii, and Virginia before moving to Georgia. He graduated from Fitzgerald High School and went on to receive a Bachelor’s Degree from Kennesaw State University and a Master’s Degree from Valdosta State University. Woods has over 25 years of pre-k through 12th-grade experience in public education.  Woods was a high school teacher for 14 years, serving as department chair and teacher mentor. During his tenure, he was also selected as Teacher of the Year. For eight years Woods served in various administrative roles such as assistant principal, principal, curriculum director, testing coordinator, pre-k director, and alternative school director. Woods also brings a business background to the superintendent's position, having been a purchasing agent for a national/multi-national laser company and a former small business owner. He and his wife Lisha, a retired 30-year educator, are long-time residents of Tifton and have been married for 27 years.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 32: Power of Local School Boards

On Thursday, December 10 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the 31st LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

This time, we'll look at local school boards. Why? According to the OECD, the U.S. is one of the only countries in the world where most decisions about school and education are made at the local level. For the most part, these decisions are made by volunteers who devote a great deal of time and energy to local issues. Most are not trained as educators. Instead, they are concerned citizens with enormous responsibility.

We'll be joined by David Snyder, former Chair of the National Council of American Indian/Alaska Native School Board Members; Armando Rodriguez, now serving his fourth term as a member of the Canutillo ISD School Board in Texas; and Karen Brohm, President of the West Hempstead School Board in a New York City suburb (joining us via audio but not video).

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

 

More about this week's guests:

8266588862?profile=RESIZE_180x180David Snyder was the Chair of the AIAN Council and on the NSBA board of directors as an ex officio voting member. I was also an ex-officio voting member for the Western Region for NSBA and the Wyoming School Boards Association.

 

8266593069?profile=RESIZE_400xArmando 'Mando' Rodriguez is a Leadership TASB Master Trustee serving his fourth term on the Canutillo ISD School Board, where his fellow trustees have elected him as Board President, Vice President and Secretary. Rodriguez has the distinction of being one of the youngest people ever to be elected into office in El Paso County, and has made it his mission to improve the quality of education in his community – especially for underserved students. A graduate of Canutillo High School and the University of Texas at El Paso, Rodriguez is a native of the Border and a leader in his community. Through his work, he ensures that students have access to high- quality educational and athletic facilities. He also is one of the founding members of the Canutillo Alumni Foundation for Education – the only organization specifically designed to award scholarships to Canutillo graduates. During his time as a Trustee, Rodriguez has played a key role in modernizing Canutillo schools. Some of the accomplishments while on the Board include the establishment of Northwest Early College, a National Blue Ribbon School and one of the best high schools in the country according to U.S. News & World Report; the creation of the Canutillo Connect initiative that bridged the digital divide in the community by distributing Apple devices to all students and creating better internet connectivity throughout the District; and the back-to-back A rating for the District by the Texas Education Agency – the only District in the region to achieve this distinction. Rodriguez’s work on behalf of students extends beyond El Paso. He serves on the Board of Directors of the National School Board Association, where he also serves as chair of the National Hispanic Council and as Secretary of the National School Board Action Center. Just recently Rodriguez was selected to serve as Secretary of the Texas Association of School Boards, the state’s largest public-education advocacy and support organization. He currently serves as the Region 19 Representative on the TASB Board of Directors. Other leadership positions for Rodriguez include being a member of the Board of Directors for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. Previously, Rodriguez has served as president of the Mexican American School Board Association and the Far West Texas School Board Association.

 

8274954086?profile=RESIZE_400xKaren Brohm is the President of the Board of Education in West Hempstead, New York. A life-long resident of West Hempstead, Karen Brohm has served in various community and elected positions throughout the West Hempstead UFSD and community. She has a strong belief in the value of a quality education and promoting equity and diversity. She volunteers her time to deliver food to families throughout the year and for Thanksgiving. As well, she is a key organizer of our joint venture with a local hospital to deliver holiday gifts to families in need. In 2012, she decided to take the next step in her journey and became a trustee of the Board of Education. She has been on the Board ever since and has served as President for the past 9 years. Karen has been recognized by NYSSBA for her dedication and continued growth as trustee. She has served on several forums to improve education and has been a driving force behind the districts push to a student-led learning environment.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 31: The Role of the State, Part 2

(Part 1 was Episode 25:Education Decisions at the State Level)

On Thursday, December 3 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the 31st LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. When we produced Episode 25 (below), we found state leadership to be remarkably forward-thinking and open-minded about school, so we continue today with a similar discussion. We continue today. This was intriguing because so much of what teachers and school districts discuss are the requirements of the state.  Time to look at several other states, and so this week, we visit with leadership from Kansas, Vermont and Maine.
 

We'll be joined by Dr. Randy Watson, Kansas Commissioner of Education; Pender Makin, Maine Commissioner of Education; and Heather Bouchey, Ph.D., Deputy Secretary, Vermont Agency of Education. In this particular episode, one or more of our guests will not be with us for the entire hour, but we look forward to a lively discussion just the same.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

8238349492?profile=RESIZE_400xDr. Randy Watson was named Commissioner of Education by the Kansas State Board of Education in November 2014, while he was still serving as Superintendent of McPherson schools, USD 418. During his tenure with the Kansas State Department of Education, Dr. Watson has rapidly become known for his visionary leadership to position Kansas as an innovator in rethinking a century-old school model. The Kansans Can vision to lead the world in the success of each student continues to drive the work of the Kansas State Board and the state education agency. Among the forward-thinking initiatives are balancing the emphasis between academic test scores and the characteristics Kansans identified as ensuring student success. Dr. Watson was instrumental in introducing statewide outcomes for social-emotional growth, kindergarten readiness, individual plans of study, graduation attainment, and post-secondary success. Commissioner Watson has been recognized nationally for guiding student-focused, personalized learning through the Kansans Can School Redesign Project, which fuels the State Board’s vision for education. Five cohorts of systems are currently engaged in the redesign process to tailor instruction to students’ strengths, needs, and interests. Dr. Watson is a lifelong Kansan who was raised in Coffeyville and went on to earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Kansas State University. He received his doctorate of education in secondary administration, school law, curriculum development, and instructional leadership, and district level certification also from K-State. He was named a Kansas State Education Alumni Fellow in 2002. Among his many other honors and recognitions as Kansas Superintendent of the Year (2015) and Outstanding Service Award recipient from the United School Administrators of Kansas (2020). His long-time career in education spans nearly every level of the field, all while serving Kansas students - first as a teacher and coach, followed by administrative positions as principal and superintendent, and as part-time faculty for higher education. As Commissioner, he has personally visited each of the state’s 286 school districts and continues to speak with educators, staff, and students regularly throughout the year.

 

8238354669?profile=RESIZE_400xAcross her more than 20-year career, Pender Makin has devoted herself to the mission of public education. From 1997 to 2003, she served as a classroom teacher at Fred C. Wescott Junior High School in Westbrook. She went on to become principal at The REAL (Regional Education Alternative Learning) School on Mackworth Island in Falmouth, a position she held for more than a decade from 2003 to 2015. As principal at The REAL School – an alternative and service-based high school for students who have struggled in traditional school settings – Makin and her team supported high-risk students from 28 sending school districts through innovative academic and experiential programming. Since 2015, Makin has served as the Assistant Superintendent of the Brunswick School Department. Makin has served on Maine's Juvenile Justice Advisory Group since 2014. She is also a co-founder of Collaborative for Perpetual Innovation, a professional development, technical assistance, and consulting company for educators, school and district leaders, and counselors. Makin has served on a number of legislative workgroups and committees seeking to improve educational opportunities for Maine's students and to promote the work of Maine public schools. She also provides training for educators and mental health professionals and speaks at state and national conferences on topics such as restorative justice, cognitive neuroscience, dropout prevention, organizational culture, and climate. Makin was named the 2013-2014 Maine Principal of the Year by the Maine Principal’s Association and has also received the Milken Educator Award, a national distinction bestowed upon educators for exceptional educational talent, exemplary educational accomplishments, and an engaging and inspiring presence that motivates and impacts students. Makin has also won the MTV Local Hero Award. Makin is charged with leading the state agency that administers both state education subsidy and state and federal grant programs; coordinates the authoring of the rules for Maine State education statutes passed by the Maine State Legislature; provides professional development, information, supports, and resources, as well as a system for educator credentialing; and leads many collaborative opportunities and partnerships in support of local schools and districts. Makin grew up in Saco, attended local schools, and graduated from Thornton Academy. She worked as a mate and deckhand on her father's deep-sea fishing charter boat during the summers beginning at age eight. She earned both her B.A. in English Literature and her M.S. in School Leadership from the University of Southern Maine and received her teacher certification from the University of New England’s Department of Education in 1996. She lives in Scarborough with her husband, Mike – a middle school science teacher – and their two rescue dogs.

 

8238356056?profile=RESIZE_400xDeputy Secretary Heather Bouchey oversees all programmatic Divisions within the Agency of Education including Data Management and Analysis, Education Quality, Federal Education Support Programs, Student Pathways, and Student Support Services. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Cornell University and Ph.D. at the University of Denver, with postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan. Deputy Secretary Bouchey has published extensively in the fields of education and psychology. The aspects of her work she loves most include both team development and collaborative problem-solving, as well as bringing data to bear on policy solutions. Having come from humble economic roots, Deputy Secretary Bouchey is deeply committed to ensuring that all students have access to meaningful educational opportunities that improve their chances for life success. Her postsecondary experiences as a first-generation college student profoundly shaped her identity and professional interests.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 30: Free to Learn

 
At this time of the year (November-December 2020), people are busy, so it's been wise to focus on single-guest episodes. Psychologist Peter Gray has been on our list of must-have guests since we started Reinventing School. His thoughts on the importance of play and students' freedom to learn have been both inspiring and extraordinarily practical in this time of the coronavirus. This one-on-one interview is unique because we were able to speak candidly about our own very different childhoods, and their fundamental similarities.
 

More about this week's guest:

8221355267?profile=RESIZE_400xPeter Gray has conducted and published research in neuroendocrinology, developmental psychology, anthropology, and education. He is the author of an internationally acclaimed introductory psychology textbook, Psychology, (Worth Publishers, 7th edition), which views all of psychology from an evolutionary perspective. His recent research focuses on the role of play in human evolution and how children educate themselves, through play and exploration, when they are free to do so. He has expanded on these ideas in his book, Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life (Basic Books). He also authors a regular blog called "Freedom to Learn," for Psychology Today magazine. Gray’s expertise has been utilized by such media entities as CNN International; Fox News Channel; Korean Education Broadcasting System; Dutch Public Television; BBC News; NPR; CJAD (Montreal); ABC Sydney, Australia; Canadian Broadcasting Company; Talk Radio 702, South Africa; News Talk Radio (Ireland).

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 29: Positive Education & Progress

 
Our exploration of well-being education continues with another one-guest episode. This time, our guest is Lea Waters, who has been a leader in the Positive Psychology movement for many years. She is one of the world's leading experts on Positive Education, Positive Organization, and Strength-Based Parenting and Teaching.
 

More about this week's guest:

8221353489?profile=RESIZE_400xLea Waters, Ph.D., is the Founding Director and Inaugural Gerry Higgins Chair in Positive Psychology at the Centre for Positive Psychology, University of Melbourne where she has held an academic position for two and a half decades. Lea holds affiliate positions at Cambridge University and the University of Michigan and serves on the Scientific Board at the University of California, Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center. Lea is a Board Member and the recent Past President of the International Positive Psychology Association (2017-2019), serves on the Council of Happiness and Education for the World Happiness Council, is the Patron of Flourishing Education Japan and Ambassador for the Positive Education Schools Association. She is a registered psychologist (AHPRA) and a full member of the Australian Psychological Society. As a University researcher, Lea turns her science into strength-based strategies to help organizations, educators, and parents around the world build resilience in their employees and children, helping them to thrive. Lea is a Board Member and the 2017-2019 President of the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA) and founding director of the Centre for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne. Lea holds affiliate positions at Cambridge University and the University of Michigan and serves on the Scientific Board at the University of California, Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center. She is the author of The Strength Switch. Lea’s work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and more.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 28: School Reform - The Long View

 

We're a bit off our regular weekly schedule, but we're thrilled to present a full hour with the remarkable Deborah Meier. She has been on the front lines of school and education reform for decades. And she is a delight: exceedingly knowledgable, deeply experienced, passionate, and reflective about all that she has done. She's also frustrated because the change has not been everything we need; in fact, we've fallen quite short. This is one of those interviews that I'm hoping people will pass along so everyone can learn as much as I did--HB

More about this week's guest:

8240672685?profile=RESIZE_710xDeborah Meier has been working in public education as a teacher, principal, writer, advocate since the early 1960s, and ranks among the most acclaimed leaders of the school reform movement in the U.S. She started her work as an early childhood teacher in Chicago after graduating from the U of Chicago. Her family moved to NYC in the late 1960s where she worked as a kindergarten teacher in Central Harlem. For the next 20 years, Meier helped revitalize public schools in New York City’s East Harlem District 4. In 1974, she founded Central Park East Elementary School (CPE I), a highly successful public school of choice that served predominantly local African American and Hispanic families. During the next dozen years, Meier opened two other Central Park East elementary schools in District 4 as well as an acclaimed secondary school (CPESS), while also supporting and directing the development of similar schools throughout NYC. She helped found the Coalition of Essential Schools, in the 1980s, under the leadership of Ted Sizer.  In 1987 she received a MacArthur “genius” Award for her work in public education. During the 1990s she also served as an Urban Fellow at the Annenberg Institute. In 1995 she moved to Boston to start Mission Hill, a K-8 school in Roxbury. These schools were part of a network Meier created that helped initiate new small schools, both elementary and secondary, both in NYC and Boston. At Coalition schools, Meier helped foster democratic communities, giving teachers greater autonomy in the running of a school, giving parents a voice in what happens to their children in schools, and promoting intergenerational connections. She has always been a proponent of active, project-based learning, and graduation through a series of exhibitions of high-quality work. She is the author of many books and articles, including The Power of Their Ideas, Lessons to America from a Small School in Harlem, and In Schools We Trust. She is an outspoken critic of state-mandated curriculum and high stakes standardized testing and has written extensively on their unreliability and class/race biases. She is on the board of  FairTest, Save Our Schools, Center for Collaborative Education, and the Association for Union Democracy. She is also on the editorial board of The Nation, The Harvard Education Letter, and Dissent magazines.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 27: Learning as a Hero's Journey

On Thursday, October 29 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the 27th LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

One of the best ways to understand the life of a student is to study the mythology of the Hero's Journey. Over a dozen years, every student leaves the ordinary world of his or her young childhood and responds to a call for adventure. Many students don't want to go. They want the security and comfort of the familiar, so they refuse the call. Then, they meet a mentor, a teacher, a kind soul who guides them toward a threshold. But there are tests along the way, allies, enemies, and eventually, a series of difficult ordeals. The young student becomes the smarter older soul; he or she overcomes the midpoint in the journey and carries the reward along a road back home, much improved by the process. But there are further obstacles, deeper dangers, reasons for doubt, and the very real possibility that the elixir, the magic of personal growth, will be lost. This is the hero's journey, the basis for so many stories, books, movies, videogames, legends. Fortunately, author Christopher Vogler studied the journey and has written about it in great detail. His work, written for writers who use it as a tool to build their own stories (many books, many screenplays), is called The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. Earlier this year, the book was published in a 25th-anniversary edition, and we're here to celebrate. We're also here to discuss the use of this important, and popular book, for learning and in school. To help us do that, we'll be joined by Will Linn, Founder of the Mythology Channel and Founding Chair of the General Education Department at Hussian College--a new film and performing arts school; Julia Torres, Teacher Librarian, Montbello Campus Library, Denver Public Schools; and Julie M. Wilson, Founder & Executive Director of the Institute for the Future of Learning. 

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

8085067269?profile=RESIZE_400xChris Vogler is the author of THE WRITER'S JOURNEY: Mythic Structure for Writers, now in its 4th (25th Anniversary) Edition.  A synthesis of screenwriting structure and the ancient patterns of mythology, the book has become required reading in movie studios, publishing houses, game design studios, and creative writing programs around the world.  As an Air Force officer, Vogler made documentary films for the military space program, then attended the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts.  He entered the movie business as a story analyst and worked for many years as a story consultant and researcher for the Walt Disney Company, where he contributed to the animated stories of HERCULES, ALADDIN and THE LION KING.  He became a studio executive at 20th Century Fox and helped to develop the films COURAGE UNDER FIRE, VOLCANO, FIGHT CLUB and THE THIN RED LINE.  He now gives workshops on the Hero's Journey pattern in literature and film.

 

8085070083?profile=RESIZE_400xWill Linn currently co-hosts a radio show that he created for the Santa Barbara News-Press called Mythosophia, in which he interviews leading story artists and scholars from such territories as myth and religion, sci-fi and fantasy, visions and dreams, rituals, novels, films, comics, and other storytelling formats and mediums. He is in his fifth year as founder and host of the Joseph Campbell Foundation Mythological RoundTable® group of Ojai, CA, which meets beneath the historic Teaching Tree at The Ojai Foundation. He also writes the newsletter for the global grassroots network of Mythological RoundTable® groups (60+ on 6 continents). In the last five years, he has been a leader and participant on research tours through England, Prague, Israel, Jordan, Turkey, Greece, Italy, and the Vatican. These tours were oriented around his mythological interests in Arthurian legend and the Holy Grail, the Golem and alchemy, Abrahamic religion, and Classical mythology. He is the oldest of five closely knit-brothers and has had the good fortune of having lived in Birmingham, AL; Findlay, OH; Detroit, MI; Sewanee, TN; Myrtle Beach, SC; Orlando & New Smyrna, FL; Ojai and Los Angeles, CA.

 

8085071068?profile=RESIZE_400xJulia Torres - "For many of our students, the library is the only place on campus they feel truly free," says teacher librarian Julia Torres. Close to 2,000 students attend the five middle and high schools on the Montbello Campus in northeast Denver, where an unstaffed, frequently shuttered school library suffered eight years of neglect. In its place now is a vibrant, student-focused media center, thanks to Torres. A former language arts teacher, Torres describes herself as "book mad," and it is this reputation that led the school administration to court her for a long-overdue library program overhaul. Hired as a full-time school librarian in 2018 with newly allocated funds, Torres jumped right in by "genrefying" the fiction collection. "Many of our students are not familiar with the names of YA authors, and searching the fiction collection by last name simply was not practical," Torres says. In her first year, circulation hit over 3,200 items and by February of the 2019–20 school year, it had increased to over 3,700. "Our library is currently third in the district for top circulation in libraries serving grades 6–12," she says. In addition to reinvigorating the collection, Torres arranged Skype visits with popular authors such as Jason Reynolds and Angie Thomas. "I have experienced a lot of joy in my career helping language arts teachers think in new ways about what is possible in the classroom when students really and truly feel free to shape their unique relationship with reading and with words," says Torres. She is a cofounder of #disrupttexts, described as "a crowdsourced, grassroots effort by teachers for teachers to challenge the traditional canon in order to create a more inclusive, representative, and equitable language arts curriculum." Torres’s teaching is "the practice of education for intellectual and physical liberation," she says. "Some of our most vulnerable students are often in the most restrictive and oppressive environments… We, as adults will do what we must to become facilitators supporting them, rather than enforcers indoctrinating them." She is also a "Book Ambassador" for the Educator Collaborative, a K–12 literacy think tank, and an educational consulting group.

 

8085074266?profile=RESIZE_400xJulie Margretta Wilson - "I am driven to help others realize and achieve their potential. Whether that be through my work as the President of the Academic Leadership Group, Founder of the Institute for the Future of Learning, or as an Instructor at Harvard's Extension School. I work with leaders to unlock this potential--so they can thrive as human beings and build organizations that learn and grow. The book that started it all? The Little Engine That Could :)

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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On Thursday, October 23 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the 26th LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

All-day, every day, we are exposed to news stories about the dreaded COVID-19 (2019 Novel Coronavirus) Coronavirus. As a result, most people know about six-foot distancing, masks, and we can recite some of the unfortunate statistics by county, state, and nation. There has been a great deal of discussion among teachers, in school board meetings, among parents, and certainly among students about what we must do, what could happen, whether there is a vaccine around the bend, and more. However, most of us don't know much about viruses, about this particular virus, how viruses work, what we can reasonably expect from science and medicine, and whether this is an isolated incident. To answer those questions--keeping politics out of the discussion, we've invited several scientists to help us navigate current knowledge, history, beliefs, and the future. And so, this week, we welcome Tista Ghosh, MD, MPH, Senior Director of Impact Evaluation at Grand Rounds, and former Lieutenant-Commander in the United States Public Health Service; Glenn F. Rall, Ph.D., Professor and Chief Academic Officer for Fox Chase Cancer Center; and Steven Taffet, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, SUNY Upstate Medical University.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:


8060054263?profile=RESIZE_400xTista Ghosh, MD, MPH. Senior Director of Impact Evaluation. Dr. Tista Ghosh is a physician trained in both internal medicine and preventive medicine, with her MD from Indiana University and her master’s degree in public health from Yale University. She also has had specialized training in applied epidemiology and public health practice through the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has served our country as a Lieutenant-Commander in the United States Public Health Service. Dr. Ghosh has broad experience in population health at the local, state, federal, and international levels. She was the chief medical epidemiologist for Colorado’s largest local health department and has served as Chief Medical Officer of the State of Colorado. She is also an assistant adjunct professor at the University of Colorado. Dr. Ghosh has served in a consulting role to a variety of international organizations, including the World Health Organization and UNICEF. From 2017-2019, she was appointed by the director of the CDC to serve on the United States Community Preventive Services Task Force, a panel of experts who review the evidence and make recommendations to guide population health efforts across the country. Currently, she is the Senior Director of Impact Evaluation/Regional Medical Director for Grand Rounds. Her role is to help maximize and quantify Grand Rounds’ population health impact.

 

8060060490?profile=RESIZE_400xGlenn Rall, Ph.D. is a Professor with Temple University and Chief Academic Officer at Fox Chase Cancer Center. His research interests include viral infection, immunity, and disease in the brain: Elucidating how neurotropic viruses spread to, and across, synaptic junctions; Defining principles that govern unique aspects of the host immune response within the brain; Developing mouse models to study immunity to multiple pathogenic encounters; Evaluating long-term neuropathological consequences of viral infections. His laboratory studies viral infections of the brain and the immune responses to those infections, with the goal of defining how viruses contribute to disease in humans, including cancer. Over the past decade, we have developed mouse models that have enabled mechanistic insights into viral replication and spread within neurons, and the roles played by soluble immune mediators, such as chemokines and cytokines, in viral clearance.

 

8060687678?profile=RESIZE_180x180Steven Mark Taffet, Ph.D.: Recognized as a dedicated educator and an expert in his field, Dr. Steven Taffet has been an indispensable resource at Upstate for 35 years in diverse roles, encompassing the entire spectrum of education, research, and leadership. He has led a research laboratory, authored 79 peer-reviewed publications, and obtained external funding for more than three decades.  Since 1985, he has taught Immunology to the medical students’ class, summer students in and graduate students. In addition, Dr. Taffet has been a member of numerous thesis committees for Ph.D. student research and has successfully guided two students to their MS degrees and 11 students to their PhDs. He is one of the national leaders for teaching an innovative active-learning method to Immunology. His research originally focused on the cell biology of immune function however during a 20-year collaboration he ventured into cardiovascular research making fundamental discoveries into the regulation of the cardiac gap junction protein. Dr. Taffet has chaired the College of Graduate Studies Curriculum Committee and College of Medicine Faculty Appointment and Promotions Committee served as interim chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and as assistant dean for Faculty Development, among many others. He has given 20 years of exemplary service to the American Heart Association (AHA) in his various roles in research, including service on the National Research Committee, a highly competitive committee where members are selected for being outstanding scholars. When not teaching medical students Dr. Taffet is an instructor for the National Ski Patrol teaching first aid skills to patrollers. He is one of the leaders in the local ski patrol educational programs.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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On Thursday, October 15 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the 25th LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

This week's episode looks at the world of school from a different point-of-view. Often, when asked about key classroom and school decisions, people at the local level (teachers, principals, school districts) look to state government. And so, this week, we're joined by people in charge of state education departments. This week: Randy Spaulding, Executive Director of the Washington State Board of Education; and Sydnee Dickson, Utah State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

LINKS from this episode:

https://schools.utah.gov/portraitgraduate

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:


8031730684?profile=RESIZE_400xRandy Spaulding has served as the Executive Director for the Washington State Board of Education since 2018. Previously he had served as the Director of Academic Affairs and Policy at the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC) and Higher Education Coordinating Board (HECB). His work focused on the intersections of secondary and postsecondary education to improve student transitions and raise educational attainment. Prior to his work at the Council (HECB), Randy worked in student services, admissions, and financial aid at the University of Washington Bothell. Randy received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2003.

 

8031801293?profile=RESIZE_400xSydnee Dickson has been serving as Utah State Superintendent of Public Instruction since June of 2016 and served as interim state superintendent for six months prior to that. She has nearly 10 years of experience working in the office of the Utah State Board of Education (USBE). Prior to that Dickson worked in various counseling, teaching, and leadership capacities in the Davis, Granite and Murray school districts for 27 years. She holds an Ed.D. degree in Education Leadership and Policy from the University of Utah and a master of education degree from Brigham Young University in educational leadership and administration. Her bachelor’s degree in elementary education and teaching is from Utah State University.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 24: Measuring Well-Being

 

On Thursday, October 8 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we presented the 24st LIVE episode of the LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

This week's episode continues our one-on-one interviews about Positive Psychology and Positive Education. Our guest is Peggy Kern, an associate professor at Centre for Positive Psychology within the University of Melbourne's Graduate School of Education.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

8031663677?profile=RESIZE_400xPeggy Kern's research addresses the question of who thrives in life, why, and what enhances or hinders healthy life trajectories. My research involves several related foci: understanding and measuring healthy functioning across the lifespan; identifying individual and social factors that impact life trajectories; developing positive educational communities; and systems-based approaches to wellbeing. She incorporates a lifespan perspective, innovative methodologies, and interdisciplinary collaboration throughout my research. My work is collaborative in nature, and my studies draw on multiple fields of study and a combination of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies. Peggy is well-respected in the field, and notable for her excellent (and very useful) work in defining, measuring, and building well-being. (You can find several them here: https://www.peggykern.org/research-overview.html).

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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On Thursday, October 1, we produced our first one-on-one LIVE hour of the LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

If you miss any of the LIVE sessions, you can always find the recordings on this web page several days after the recording session. You may be familiar with the concept of Positive Psychology--a two-decade-old part of psychology that studies the positive side of the human experience through hope, resilience, mindfulness, relationships, agency, and future mindedness. All of this applies to education in very useful ways. Positive Education incorporates aspects of social-emotional learning, but it goes much further. This week, we're joined for the full hour by Laurie Santos, a psychology professor whose big project at Yale University is to positively influence the culture of the institution by teaching happiness and well-being.

 

 

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

7934960696?profile=RESIZE_400xPsychologist Dr. Laurie Santos is an expert on human cognition, its origins, and the evolutionary biases that influence our all-too imperfect life choices. She is also knowledgeable about how behavioral change through positive psychology can lead to a happy and fulfilling life. Currently. the big project of Dr. Santos is to positively influence the culture of Yale University by teaching happiness and well-being. She created a course so meaningful that it became the most popular class taken at Yale in over 316 years. In her course, "Psychology and the Good Life," Santos teaches her 1200 students about behavioral change through positive psychology. Dr. Santos wants her students to be more grateful, procrastinate less, and increase social connections. She believes that those positive habits will decrease mental health issues on campus and create happier and more motivated students. The popularity of the class has prompted Yale to create a free online course. Dr. Santos is the host of the podcast, "The Happiness Lab." From her research, Santos speaks to how we are biologically programmed to be motivated by sex, to be deeply influenced by other people — and to repeat our mistakes. And while Santos often uses subjects from the animal kingdom to help explain our sometimes-illogical behaviors, she also provides advice on how to engage our uniquely human faculties to counteract evolution, choose more wisely, and live happier lives.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.

 

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EPISODE 22: Intro to Positive Education

On Thursday, September 24 at 3:00 pm US-EDT, we produced our first LIVE half-hour of the LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL.

If you miss any of the LIVE sessions, you can always find the recordings on this web page several days after the recording session.

You may be familiar with the concept of Positive Psychology--a two-decade-old part of psychology that studies the positive side of the human experience through hope, resilience, mindfulness, relationships, agency and future mindedness. All of this applies to education in very useful ways. Positive Education incorporates aspects of social-emotional learning, but it goes mufh further. This week, we're joined by Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor of The University of Buckingham since 2015, one of Britain’s leading contemporary historians, educationalists, commentators and political authors.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

7934962490?profile=RESIZE_400xSir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor of The University of Buckingham since 2015, is one of Britain’s leading contemporary historians, educationalists, commentators, and political authors. He was a transformative head for 20 years, first of Brighton College, and then Wellington College. He is author or editor of over 40 books on contemporary history, including the inside books on the last four Prime Ministers, was the co-founder and first director of the Institute for Contemporary British History, is co-founder of Action for Happiness, an honorary historical adviser to 10 Downing Street, UK Special Representative for Saudi Education, a member of the Government’s First World War Culture Committee, was chair of the Comment Awards, is a director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, the President of IPEN, (International Positive Education Network), Chair of the National Archives Trust, is patron or on the board of several charities, founder of the Via Sacra Western Front Walk, and was executive producer of the film Journey’s End. He appeared on the Desert Island Discs in 2016.  For the last fifteen years, he has given all his money from writing and lecturing to charity

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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EPISODE 21: Evaluation, Testing; Assessment

 

On Thursday, September 17 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the 21st LIVE episode of the LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. If you miss the LIVE show, we'll post the recorded version next week. 

This week's episode tries to make sense of our system of testing, evaluation, and assessment. It's not simple. It is imperfect, controversial, and beginning to change (in part due to the virus, in part because change is overdue). This week: Alfie Kohn, an independent scholar who writes and speaks about education, homework, testing, and other provocative topics; and Jeff Snyder, Chair of Educational Studies at Carleton University whose expertise includes evaluation and assessment.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

7934905893?profile=RESIZE_400xJeff Snyder is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Studies at Carleton College. His work explores the connections between the history of education and broader trends in American cultural and intellectual history, examining questions about race, national identity, and the purpose of public education in a diverse, democratic society. His teaching focuses on past and present educational policy and school reform movements. Every fall, he teaches a first-year seminar called “Will This Be on the Test? Standardized Testing and American Education.” He writes frequently for newspapers and magazines, including Education Week, the New Republic, and the Washington Post. See a recent essay where Snyder argues that getting rid of college admissions tests will not magically open the doors of educational opportunity for disadvantaged students. You can also visit his website here.

 

7934859679?profile=RESIZE_400xAlfie Kohn writes and speaks widely on human behavior, education, and parenting. The most recent of his 14 books are SCHOOLING BEYOND MEASURE…And Other Unorthodox Essays About Education (2015) and THE MYTH OF THE SPOILED CHILD: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom About Children and Parenting (2014).  Of his earlier titles, the best known are PUNISHED BY REWARDS (1993), NO CONTEST: The Case Against Competition (1986), UNCONDITIONAL PARENTING (2005), and THE SCHOOLS OUR CHILDREN DESERVE (1999). Kohn has been described in Time magazine as “perhaps the country’s most outspoken critic of education’s fixation on grades [and] test scores.” His criticisms of competition and rewards have helped to shape the thinking of educators — as well as parents and managers — across the country and abroad. Kohn has been featured on hundreds of TV and radio programs, including the “Today” show and two appearances on “Oprah”; he has been profiled in the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times, while his work has been described and debated in many other leading publications. Kohn lectures widely at universities and to school faculties, parent groups, and corporations. In addition to speaking at staff development seminars and keynoting national education conferences on a regular basis, he conducts workshops for teachers and administrators on various topics. Among them: “Motivation from the Inside Out: Rethinking Rewards, Assessment, and Learning” and “Beyond Bribes and Threats: Realistic Alternatives to Controlling Students’ Behavior.” The latter corresponds to his book BEYOND DISCIPLINE: From Compliance to Community (ASCD, 1996), which he describes as “a modest attempt to overthrow the entire field of classroom management.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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EPISODE 20: Teachers of the Year (Part Two)

On Thursday, September 10 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we celebrate with the twentieth (!) LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. If you miss the LIVE show, we'll post the recorded version early next week. 

This week's episode is the second part of a two-parter. REINVENTING SCHOOL looks at the world of the teacher. We've been working with the Council of Chief School Officers (CCSSO), and we'll be joined by three winners of their "Teacher of the Year" awards. This week: Chanda Jefferson, 2020 South Carolina Teacher of the Year, currently Albert Einstein Fellow in Congress; Rodney Robinson, 2019 National Teacher of the Year, senior advisor, Richmond Public Schools; and Tabatha Rosproy, 2020 National Teacher of the Year (Early childhood education, Winfield Early Learning Center, Winfield, KS.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

7858066652?profile=RESIZE_400xChanda Jefferson is a ninth through twelfth-grade biology teacher and department chair at Fairfield Central High School in Winnsboro, South Carolina. She is passionate about teaching in underserved communities and building students’ capacity by developing their strengths. Jefferson uses engaging activities to elicit ideas while challenging students to investigate the world around them. She infuses culturally relevant pedagogy, STEM practices, and emotional intelligence strategies to empower students and prepare them for a competitive workforce. Jefferson is an ambassador and advocate for all teachers in South Carolina and serves as the Lead Facilitator of the South Carolina State Teacher Forum. She is also committed to recruiting new teachers by sharing her teaching experiences with hundreds of pre-service teachers throughout the state. Jefferson received many distinguished honors, including the South Carolina Educational Policy Fellowship, in which she collaborates with legislatures and educational stakeholders to develop policy solutions promoting diversity and access in education. She also received the South Carolina Outstanding Biology Teacher Award, the Phi Beta Sigma Lifetime Achievement Award, and was selected for the Princeton Molecular Biology Teacher Institute. In partnership with the National Human Genome Research Institute, Jefferson was granted a proclamation establishing South Carolina DNA Day by the governor of South Carolina, which serves as a day of unity throughout the entire state. Jefferson earned a bachelor of science in biological sciences and a master’s in teaching secondary sciences from the University of South Carolina. Jefferson also earned a master of education in public school building leadership from Columbia University.

 

7858078454?profile=RESIZE_400xRodney Robinson is a 19-year teaching veteran. He became a teacher to honor his mother, who struggled to receive an education after being denied an education as a child due to segregation and poverty in rural Virginia. In 2015, Robinson started teaching at Virgie Binford Education Center, a school inside the Richmond Juvenile Detention Center, in an effort to better understand the school-to-prison pipeline. Robinson uses the whole child approach to education to help students who are most vulnerable. His classroom is a collaborative partnership between himself and his students and is anchored in him providing a civic centered education that promotes social-emotional growth. Robinson uses the knowledge he has gained from his students to develop alternative programs to prevent students from entering the school-to-prison pipeline.    Robinson has been published three times by Yale University and has received numerous awards for his accomplishments in and out of the classroom, most notably the R.E.B. Award for Teaching Excellence.  He is a member of Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney’s Education Compact Team, which includes politicians, educators, business leaders, and community leaders, and is working with city leaders and local colleges to recruit underrepresented male teachers into the field of education. He has also worked with Pulitzer Award-winning author James Foreman on developing curriculum units on race, class, and punishment as a part of the Yale Teacher’s Institute. Robinson earned a Bachelor of arts in history from Virginia State University and a master’s in educational administration and supervision from Virginia Commonwealth University.

 

7858084482?profile=RESIZE_400xTabatha Rosproy, a 10-year veteran Kansas teacher, is the first early childhood educator to be named National Teacher of the Year. She teaches preschool for Winfield Early Learning Center (WELC) in Winfield, Kansas. Housed in Cumbernauld Village, a local retirement community and nursing home, her inclusive classroom is an inter-generational program that provides preschoolers and residents with multiple daily interactions and serves special education and typically developing preschoolers in a full-day setting.  As the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closure of school buildings across the country, Rosproy served as a co-chair of the educator task force that helped compile Kansas’s continuous learning guidance. A career preschool educator, Rosproy hopes to bring a voice to the important role early childhood education plays in our society and to highlight the value of social-emotional education at all age levels. Rosproy has served on her building leadership team and as the co-head teacher of WELC and as co-president of Winfield National Education Association. She is also active at the state level with the Kansas National Education Association. Rosproy is a member of the Cowley County Special Services Cooperative Early Childhood Academy Team, which provides training and support in positive behavior interventions for early childhood teachers in her county. Rosproy holds a Bachelor of Arts in unified early childhood education, including special education and typically developing students, from Southwestern College and is near completion of her Master of Science in Education (English as a Secondary or Other Language) at Fort Hays State University.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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EPISODE 19: Teachers of the Year (Part One)

On Thursday, September 3 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the nineteenth LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. If you miss the LIVE show, we'll post the recorded version early next week. 

This week's episode begins a two-parter. REINVENTING SCHOOL looks at the world of the teacher. We've been working with the Council of Chief School Officers (CCSSO), and we'll be joined by three winners of their "Teacher of the Year" awards on Episode 19 and three more on Episode 20. This week: Lynette Stant, 2020 Arizona Teacher of the Year; Mandy Manning, 2018 National Teacher of the Year; and Takeru Nagayoshi, 2020 Massachusetts Teacher of the Year.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

More about this week's guests:

7814511875?profile=RESIZE_400xLynette Stant is a member of the Navajo Nation and a 15-year veteran elementary teacher who teaches 3rd grade on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Reservation in Scottsdale, Arizona. She holds a master's degree in education from Grand Canyon University and graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in elementary education from Arizona State University. Stant is a Gates Millennium Scholar (GMS) and part of the GMS alumni community. In addition to leading her grade level team, she serves on various school and district leadership teams and school improvement committees. She serves as a New Teacher Mentor for Salt River Schools and as a Cooperating Teacher for Northern Arizona University, Arizona State University, and the University of Phoenix to mentor future educators. Stant has presented workshops at state and national education conferences on STEM education and successfully helped write a $500,000 STEM grant for her school, providing teachers with professional development opportunities in STEM implementation and sustainability, as well as providing students authentic STEM learning opportunities. Stant was selected for the 2018 100Kin10 Teacher Forum to address the STEM teacher shortage in American schools. Her mission is to inspire her students to become leaders and remind them that in order to understand where they are going, they must embrace where they come from.

 

7814532500?profile=RESIZE_400xMandy Manning teaches English to newly arrived refugee and immigrant students in the Newcomer Center at Joel E. Ferris High School in Spokane, Washington. In her classroom, Mandy uses experiential projects like map-making to help her students process trauma, celebrate their home countries and culture, and learn about their new community. As 2018 National Teacher of the Year, Mandy will encourage educators to teach their students to overcome their fears and seek out new experiences. “Let’s teach our students to be fearless,” she says. “Let’s teach them to be brave when confronted with uncertainty. Brave when they fail. Brave in meeting new people. Brave in seeking opportunities to experience things outside of their understanding.” Mandy strives to create connections between her students and the community inside and outside of the school. Her students work in the student store and she encourages other students to visit and volunteer in the Newcomer Center. She also invites district leaders, campus resource officers, community members of color, and professional writers to visit her classroom. The visits help her students learn cultural expectations and how to express themselves effectively. In return, her students teach these leaders where they come from, who they are, and the beauty they add to the school district. “All of us together make this world interesting and good. We must teach our students to overcome their fears and seek out new experiences. The only way to teach fearlessness is to show it. We must show kindness by getting to know our students, learning about them, and showing them how to connect,” she says.  Mandy has taught for the past 19 years, seven of which have been in her current role. She earned a Bachelor of Arts from Eastern Washington University, a Masters of Arts from West Texas A & M University, and a Masters of Fine Arts from Northwest Institute of Literary Arts. Mandy is a National Board Certified Teacher.

 

7814505098?profile=RESIZE_400xTakeru Nagayoshi is the 2020 Massachusetts Teacher of the Year. He teaches Advanced Placement English at New Bedford High School, an urban low-income public school in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Nagayoshi has also piloted the research-based AP Capstone program, fewer than 10 of which existed in his state. With over 92 percent of his students passing their AP exams, he helped his district lead the state in the number of AP Certificates awarded. As a son of Japanese immigrants and as a gay person of color, Nagayoshi leverages his identities to fight for educational equity. Outside the classroom, he has written op-eds on education issues, coaches developing teachers in high-needs districts, and lends his voice to multiple panels, committees, and an educator diversity task force. He has also participated in several fellowships, including those offered by Teach Plus, the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. This year, he helped launch an educational leadership program, Southern New England Alumni Leadership Initiative (SNEALI), which develops local capacity for teachers in the Southern New England area. Nagayoshi has received recognitions such as the Sue Lehmann Excellence in Teacher Leadership Award (2019), the Boston University Young Alumni Award (2019), and the Sontag Prize in Urban Education (2018). Nagayoshi lived in Japan for five years and currently lives in Providence, RI. He graduated magna cum laude from Brown University with an honors bachelor of arts in international relations and a master of education in curriculum and teaching from Boston University.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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EPISODE 18: Broadband Inequality

On Thursday, August 27 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the eighteenth LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. If you miss the LIVE show, we'll post the recorded version early next week. 

This week, REINVENTING SCHOOL asks a basic question: if distance learning is the solution, how does this work without 100% broadband coverage in the U.S.? By our count, about 2 in 3 U.S. students (K-12) lack either reliable fast broadband service, the necessary devices, or a quiet space to study and learn. Our discussion will focus on broadband inequality so we can learn the reasons why the system is (wildly) imperfect, and what is being done to correct the situation.

Our guest experts: Dr. Veronica C. Garcia, Superintendent of New Mexico's Santa Fe Public Schools; Matt Dunne, Founder & Executive Director, Center on Rural Innovation; Dee Davis, Center for Rural Strategies; Michael Romano, Senior Vice President of Industry Affairs, NTCA - The Rural Broadband Association; and Evan Marwell, Founder and CEO of EducationSuperHighway.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

  
More about this week's guests:

7608536299?profile=RESIZE_400xDr. Veronica C. Garcia, Superintendent of Santa Fe Public Schools, has extensive experience working in the policy arena in various capacities, including serving as Executive Director for NM Voices for Children, Executive Director of the New Mexico Coalition of School Administrators, and New Mexico’s first Cabinet Secretary of Education. As Cabinet Secretary of Education, she advocated for the passage of many educational reforms including the state’s Pre-K Act, Hispanic Education Act, programs that extend the school year for at-risk children (K-3 Plus), and rigorous academic standards that were recognized nationally. She also pushed for a comprehensive approach to educational reform by advocating for increased funding for programs such as school-based health clinics, breakfast in the schools, and elementary physical education. Under her leadership, New Mexico garnered top rankings for school reform, accountability systems, increased teacher quality, data quality, health and wellness policies, parental involvement, and college and career readiness.

Prior to becoming the interim superintendent of Santa Fe Public Schools, Dr. Garcia served as the Executive Director of New Mexico Voices for Children, a state children’s advocacy organization that champions policies meant to improve child well-being in the areas of education, health, family economic security, and racial and ethnic equity. During her time as executive director of NM Voices for Children, she fully integrated the organization’s two major work areas—the KIDS COUNT program and the Fiscal Policy Project—which resulted in the creation of the NM KIDS are COUNTing on Us policy campaign, a blueprint for improving child well-being. Her decades of work within the state’s K-12 education system have also included teaching in the classroom, serving as principal and regional superintendent in the Albuquerque Public Schools, and serving as associate superintendent and superintendent of the Santa Fe Public Schools. As the Superintendent of Santa Fe Public Schools from 1999-2002, the District transformed a $2.6 million deficit into a $2.4 million cash balance.

7608554871?profile=RESIZE_400xMatt Dunne is the Founder and Executive Director of the Center on Rural Innovation. He served 11 years in the Vermont House and Senate, enacting the state’s first broadband grants, brownfields revitalization funding, and downtown redevelopment program. He helped grow a VT-based software company to over 100 people and was Associate Director of the Rockefeller Center on Public Policy at Dartmouth College. In 1999 Matt was appointed director of AmeriCorps*VISTA under President Clinton, where he led PowerUp, one of the first national efforts to bridge the digital divide, and launched an Entrepreneur Corps to focus on micro-finance in high-need communities. In 2007, he started Google’s Community Affairs division out of a former bread factory in White River Jct, VT, where he led all local US philanthropy and engagement, including the Google Fiber rollout and orchestrating educational and development initiatives in Google’s data center communities across rural America. Matt has a BA from Brown University, and also held an appointment at the MIT Media Lab. He is a lifelong Vermonter who lives on the 100-acre farm where he was raised.

 

7608590269?profile=RESIZE_400xDee Davis is the founder and president of the Center for Rural Strategies. Dee has helped design and lead national public information campaigns on topics as diverse as commercial television programming and federal banking policy. Dee began his media career in 1973 as a trainee at Appalshop, an arts and cultural center devoted to exploring Appalachian life and social issues in Whitesburg, Kentucky. As Appalshop's executive producer, the organization created more than 50 public TV documentaries, established a media training program for Appalachian youth, and launched initiatives that use media as a strategic tool in organization and development. He is the chair of the Rural Assembly steering committee; a member of the Rural Advisory Committee of the Local Initiatives Support Corporation, Fund for Innovative Television, and Feral Arts of Brisbane, Australia. He is also a member of the Institute for Rural Journalism’s national advisory board. He is a member of the Board of Directors for the Institute for Work and the Economy. Dee is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Commission on the Practice of Democratic Citizenship. Dee is also the former Chair of the board of directors of Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation. Dee received an English degree from the University of Kentucky. He lives in Whitesburg, Kentucky.

 

7608630497?profile=RESIZE_400xMichael Romano joined NTCA–The Rural Broadband Association as senior vice president of industry affairs and business development on August 23, 2010. Romano oversees the organization's public policy, government affairs, business development and Foundation for Rural Service initiatives on behalf of its nearly 850 small rural telecom provider members. Before joining NTCA, Romano was of counsel at Bingham McCutchen, LLP, where he advised telecom carriers regarding broadband stimulus and other federal broadband network funding opportunities, and negotiated agreements on a variety of issues including equipment and software licensing and sales, outsourcing arrangements and dispute settlements, among other duties. Prior to joining Bingham McCutchen, Romano served as vice president and general counsel of Global Telecom & Technology, was counsel in the intellectual property group at America Online, and held a number of positions in the legal department of Level 3 Communications. He began his legal career as an associate at Swidler Berlin, LLP.

 

7608648488?profile=RESIZE_400xEvan Marwell is a serial entrepreneur, having started companies over the last 25 years in the telecom, software, hedge fund, and consumer retailing industries including INFONXX (now KGB) and Criterion Capital Management. Collectively, these businesses created thousands of jobs and generated billions of dollars of revenues and investment returns. Evan founded the non-profit EducationSuperHighway in 2012. In its first three years, the organization helped shape President Obama’s ConnectED initiative and served as a catalyst for modernization of the Federal Communications Commission’s $3.9 billion E-rate program, earning Evan the 2015 Visionary of the Year award from the San Francisco Chronicle. Evan is an honors graduate of Harvard College ’87 and Harvard Business School ’92.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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EPISODE 17: CYBERATTACK!

We are producing TWO episodes this week, one on Wednesday and one on Thursday.

On Thursday, August 20 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the seventeenth LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. If you miss the LIVE show, we'll post the recorded version early next week. 

This week, REINVENTING SCHOOL considers a serious technology threat to (a) our sanity; (b) our business and industry; and (c) our schools. Could a giant cyberattack disrupt or even disable our access to the internet? (How would we do distance learning with no internet?) Is our national power grid at risk? What happens if a cyberattack strikes in the midst of the pandemic? Are we thinking about any of this clearly? For clear and rational answers, we look authors and experts who presented the Solarium Cyberspace Commission report mandated by the U.S. Congress (see NY Times article)

  • “The U.S. government is currently not designed to act with the speed and agility necessary to defend the country in cyberspace,” the final report of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission concludes. “We must get faster and smarter, improving the government’s ability to organize concurrent, continuous and collaborative efforts to build resilience, respond to cyber threats, and preserve military options that signal a capability and willingness to impose costs on adversaries.”

Our guest experts: Frank Cilluffo, Director, McCrary Institute for Cyber & Critical Infrastructure Security at Auburn University, Suzanne Spaulding, Senior Adviser for Homeland Security and leads the Defending Democratic Institutions Project (DDI) at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), and Mark Montgomery, Executive Director, Cyberspace Solarium Commission.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.
  
More about this week's guests:

7516847479?profile=RESIZE_400xSuzanne Spaulding. Ms. Suzanne E. Spaulding, was appointed to the Commission by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY). Ms. Spaulding is Senior Adviser for Homeland Security and leads the Defending Democratic Institutions Project (DDI) at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Previously, she served as Under Secretary for the Department of Homeland Security, where she led the National Protection and Programs Directorate, now called the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), managing a $3 billion budget and a workforce of 18,000, charged with strengthening cybersecurity and protecting the nation’s critical infrastructure, including election infrastructure. She led the transformation of budget, acquisition, analytic, and operational processes to bring greater agility and unity of effort to an organization that had experienced dramatic growth through acquisition of new entities and missions over several years.

Throughout her career, Ms. Spaulding has advised CEOs, boards, and government policymakers on how to manage complex security risks, across all industry sectors. At DHS, she led the development and implementation of national policies for strengthening the security and resilience of critical infrastructure against cyber and physical risks, including the National Infrastructure Protection Plan and key Presidential Directives and Executive Orders. She worked with industry to establish CEO-level coordinating councils in the electric and financial services sectors; chaired the federal government’s Aviation Cybersecurity Initiative to identify and address key cyber vulnerabilities in the national aviation system; and worked with many foreign governments on critical infrastructure and cybersecurity, including negotiating agreements with China and Israel. Ms. Spaulding also led security regulation of the chemical industry; biometrics and identity management; emergency communications; and the Federal Protective Service. As a member of the Board of Directors for the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet), Ms. Spaulding helped oversee the complex and unprecedented effort to deploy the first nation-wide broadband network for public safety. She is currently on the Board of Directors for Defending Digital Campaigns (DDC) and for Girl Security; and Advisory Boards for Nozomi Networks, Splunk, MITRE, Harvard University’s Defending Digital Democracy project, Foundation for Defense of Democracies, and the Technology Law and Security Program at American University. She is a member of the Homeland Security Experts Group, sits on the Council of Executives for the Center for Cyber and Homeland Security at Auburn University, and is on the faculty of the National Association of Corporate Directors. Following the attacks of 9/11, Ms. Spaulding worked with key critical infrastructure sectors as they reviewed their security posture and advised the CEOs of the Business Roundtable. In 2002, she was appointed by Governor Mark Warner of Virginia to the Secure Commonwealth Panel to advise the governor and the legislature regarding preparedness issues. She was managing partner of the Harbour Group; a principal in the Bingham Consulting Group; and of counsel to Bingham McCutchen, LLP. Ms. Spaulding has served in Republican and Democratic administrations and on both sides of the aisle in Congress. She was general counsel for the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and minority staff director for the U.S. House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. She also spent six years at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), where she was Assistant General Counsel and legal adviser to the director’s Nonproliferation Center. She was a member of the CSIS Commission on Cybersecurity for the 44th Presidency, which developed a bipartisan national cybersecurity strategy in advance of the 2008 election; executive director of the National Commission on Terrorism and the Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction; and a consultant on the Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction and the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction. She is former chair of the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security; founder of the Cybersecurity Legal Task Force; and was a member of Harvard University’s Long-Term Legal Strategy Project for Preserving Security and Democratic Freedoms in the War on Terror.

 

7516781676?profile=RESIZE_400xFrank Cilluffo is a member of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission and the Department of Homeland Security’s Advisory Council, and he’s routinely called upon to advise senior officials in the executive branch, U.S. Armed Services, and state and local governments on an array of matters related to national and homeland security strategy and policy. In addition to briefing Congressional committees and their staffs, he has publicly testified before Congress on numerous occasions, serving as a subject matter expert on policies related to cyber threats, counterterrorism, security and deterrence, weapons proliferation, organized crime, intelligence and threat assessments, emergency management, and border and transportation security. Similarly, he works with U.S. allies and organizations such as NATO and Europol. He has presented at a number of bi-lateral and multi-lateral summits on cybersecurity and countering terrorism, including the U.N. Security Council.

Following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Cilluffo was appointed by President George W. Bush to the newly created Office of Homeland Security. There, he was involved in a wide range of homeland security and counterterrorism strategies, policy initiatives and served as a principal advisor to Director Tom Ridge, directing the president’s Homeland Security Advisory Council. Cilluffo then joined George Washington University in 2003, establishing the Center for Cyber and Homeland Security as a prominent nonpartisan "think and do tank" dedicated to building bridges between theory and practice to advance U.S. security. He served as an associate vice president where he led a number of national security and cybersecurity policy and research initiatives. He directed the Center for Cyber and Homeland Security and, with the School of Business, launched the university’s World Executive MBA in Cybersecurity program. Prior to his White House appointment, Cilluffo spent eight years in senior policy positions with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington-based think tank. There, he chaired or directed numerous committees and task forces on homeland defense, counterterrorism, and transnational organized crime, as well as information warfare and information assurance. He has published extensively in academic, law, business, and policy journals, as well as magazines and newspapers worldwide. His work has been published through ABC News, Foreign Policy, The Journal of International Security Affairs, The National Interest, Parameters, Politico, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report, The Washington Quarterly and The Washington Post. He currently serves on the editorial advisory board for Military and Strategic Affairs and has served as an on-air consultant for CBS News and as a reviewer for a number of publications and foundations.

 

7516832884?profile=RESIZE_400xMark Montgomery serves as the Executive Director of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission. He most recently served as Policy Director for the Senate Armed Services Committee under the leadership of Senator John S. McCain. In this position, he coordinated policy efforts on national defense strategy, capabilities and requirements, defense policy, and cyber issues. Mark served for 32 years in the U.S. Navy as a nuclear trained surface warfare officer, retiring as a Rear Admiral in 2017. His flag officer assignments included Director of Operations (J3) at U. S. Pacific Command; Commander of Carrier Strike Group 5 embarked on the USS George Washington stationed in Japan; and Deputy Director, Plans, Policy and Strategy (J5), at U. S. European Command. He was selected as a White House Fellow and assigned to the National Security Council, serving as Director for Transnational Threats from 1998-2000. Mark graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history. He subsequently earned a master’s degree in history from Oxford University and completed the U.S. Navy’s nuclear power training program.

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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We are producing TWO episodes this week, one on Wednesday and one on Thursday.

On Wednesday, August 19 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the sixteenth LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. If you miss the LIVE show, we'll post the recorded version early next week. 

This week, REINVENTING SCHOOL goes deep into the question of the safety, wisdom and controversy associated with opening, and perhaps closing, U.S. schools. For this special episode, we look to Avik Roy, Dan Lips and Preston Cooper, all co-authors of a popular WSJ cover story entitled Why It's (Mostly) Safe to Reopen the Schools. Find out  more about our guests below.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.

  
More about this week's guests:

7516604256?profile=RESIZE_400xAvik Roy the Policy Editor at Forbes, is President of the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity (FREOPP.org), a non-partisan, non-profit think tank that conducts original research on expanding opportunity to those who least have it. Roy’s work has been praised widely on both the right and the left. National Review has called him one of the nation’s “sharpest policy minds,” while the New York Times’ Paul Krugman described him as a man of “personal and moral courage.” He has advised three presidential candidates on policy, including Marco Rubio, Rick Perry, and Mitt Romney. He is widely known for his work on health care reform. NBC’s Chuck Todd, on Meet the Press, said Roy was one “of the most thoughtful guys [who has] been debating” health care reform. MSNBC’s Chris Hayes calls Roy's Forbes blog, The Apothecary, “one of the best takes from conservatives on that set of issues.” Ezra Klein, in the Washington Post, called The Apothecary one of the few “blogs I disagree with [that] I check daily.” Roy is the author of How Medicaid Fails the Poor, and Affordable Health Care for Every Generation: A Patient-Centered Plan for Universal Coverage and Permanent Fiscal Solvency. He is a senior advisor to the Bipartisan Policy Center, serves on the advisory board of the National Institute for Health Care Management, and co-chaired the Fixing Veterans Health Care Policy Taskforce. Prior to his career in public policy, Roy was a professional healthcare investor, serving as an analyst and portfolio manager at Bain Capital, J.P. Morgan, and other firms.

 

7516625294?profile=RESIZE_400xDan Lips is the Policy Director for the Chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. He has worked on the passage of bipartisan legislation and oversight investigations including as a staff member of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. Dan was the lead staff author of the 2015 minority staff oversight report, “A Review of the Department of Homeland Security’s Missions and Performance.” Before Capitol Hill, Dan served as an intelligence analyst with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He previously was a senior policy analyst at the Heritage Foundation, where he was the lead analyst researching education.  His research has been referenced in the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. He has testified before Congress and state legislative committees. Dan also served as a member of the D.C. Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Dan earned his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University. He earned his master’s degree from the Institute of World Politics in Washington, DC, where he wrote his master’s thesis on public diplomacy during the Cold War.

 

7516645880?profile=RESIZE_400xPreston Cooper: "I am a Visiting Fellow at the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity, where I study the economics of higher education. Formerly, I worked at the American Enterprise Institute and the Manhattan Institute. In addition to writing for Forbes, my writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Seattle Times, U.S. News and World Report, the Washington Examiner, Fortune, RealClearPolicy, and National Review. I hold a B.A. in economics from Swarthmore College. Follow me on Twitter: @PrestonCooper93"

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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EPISODE 15: Student Empowerment

On Thursday, August 13 at 4:00 pm US-EDT, we present the fifteenth LIVE episode of the new LearningRevolution.com weekly interview series, REINVENTING SCHOOL. If you miss the LIVE show, we'll post the recorded version early next week.

This week, REINVENTING SCHOOL is all about student empowerment, agency, and a model of learning that grows from the needs of children and teenagers. While the education system promises this approach, many students, parents, and teachers see a need for change. In addition to several students who are so important to these conversations, we welcome Chris Lehmann, founding principal and CEO of Science Leadership Academy, Julie Evans is the CEO of Project Tomorrow, an internationally recognized education nonprofit organization that focuses on improving learning opportunities for students through the effective use of STEM resources. Michelle D. Jones founded and now runs a college that she founded, Wayfinding Academy.

Please join us on Thursdays for our live shows, or visit www.reinventing.school for the recorded versions.
  

More about this week's guests:

7417571084?profile=RESIZE_400xChris Lehmann is the founding principal and CEO of the Science Leadership Academy and the Science Leadership Academy Schools network, a network of three progressive science and technology schools in Philadelphia, PA. The Science Leadership Academy is an inquiry-driven, project-based, 1:1 laptop school that is considered to be one of the pioneers of the School 2.0 movement nationally and internationally. Science Leadership Academy is the Dell Computing Center of Excellence for Technology in Education. The school was recognized by Ladies Home Journal as one of the Ten Most Amazing Schools in the US, was recognized as a “Breaking Ranks” Model School by the National Association of Secondary School Principals, and is recognized as the Dell Computing Center of Excellence in Education.  SLA has been written about in many publications including Edutopia Magazine, EdWeek, and the Philadelphia Inquirer. In 2013, Chris co-founded the non-profit Inquiry Schools with Diana Laufenberg to help more schools create more empowering, modern learning experiences for students. In partnership with Inquiry Schools, Chris opened Science Leadership Academy @ Beeber campus, the second campus in the SLA model, and in 2016, Chris co-founded Science Leadership Academy Middle School. Chris returned to his native Philadelphia after nine years as an English Teacher, Technology Coordinator, Girls Basketball Coach, and Ultimate Frisbee coach at the Beacon School in New York City, one of the leading urban public schools for technology integration.

 

7417600854?profile=RESIZE_400xJulie Evans is the CEO of Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org), an internationally recognized education nonprofit organization that focuses on improving learning opportunities for students through the effective use of STEM resources. Dr. Evans has been CEO of this organization since 1999 and during that tenure has created several innovative initiatives to impact education including the heralded Speak Up Research Project which annually collects and reports on the authentic views of 500,000 K-12 students, parents and educators on education issues each year.  Dr. Evans serves as the lead strategist and chief researcher on the Speak Up Project as well as leading research efforts on the impact of mobile devices, digital content, and blended learning models in both K-12 and higher education.  Over the past thirteen years, 5 million K-12 students, teachers, and parents have participated in the Speak Up Project representing over 35,000 schools from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and around the world.

 

7417624858?profile=RESIZE_400xMichelle D. Jones: "A couple of years ago I started my own college. I am in the midst of doing my life's work right now, which is exhilarating and terrifying. During my 15 years of teaching Leadership and Organizational Behavior courses in the traditional college system, I had a front-row seat for what is broken about that system. About 3 years ago, I gathered a group of like-minded badasses around a vision of what a revolution in higher education could look like. After years of helping amazing groups and non-profits organize for social impact (SuperThank, TEDxMtHood, World Domination Summit) I started my own legacy project — Wayfinding Academy was born."

 

4995562699?profile=RESIZE_400xHoward Blumenthal created and produced the PBS television series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? He is currently a Senior Scholar at The University of Pennsylvania, studying learning and the lives of 21st-century children and teenagers. He travels the world, visiting K-12 schools, lecturing at universities, and interviewing young people for Kids on Earth, a global platform containing nearly 1,000 interview segments from Kentucky, Brazil, Sweden, India, and many other countries. Previously, he was a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist for The New York Times Syndicate, and United Features. He is the author of 24 books and several hundred articles about technology, learning, business, and human progress. As an executive, Howard was the CEO of a public television operation and several television production companies, and a state government official. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President for divisions of two large media companies, Hearst and Bertelsmann, and a consultant or project lead for Energizer, General Electric, American Express, CompuServe, Warner Communications, Merriam-Webster, Atari, and other companies.
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ABOUT THE SHOW

Before the virus, more than a billion children and teenagers relied upon school for learning. After the virus (or, after the current wave of our current virus), basic assumptions about school and education are no longer reliable. School buildings may become unsafe for large numbers of students. The tax base may no longer support our current approach to school. Without the interaction provided by a formal school structure, students may follow their own curiosity. Many students now possess the technology to learn on their own. And many do not.

Reinventing.school is a new weekly web television series that considers what happens next week, next month, next school year, and the next five years. Hosted by University of Pennsylvania Senior Scholar Howard Blumenthal, Reinventing.school features interviews with teachers, principals, school district leadership, state and Federal government officials, ed-tech innovators, students, leading education professors, authors, realists and futurists from the United States and all over the world.

Each episode features 2-4 distinguished guests in conversation about high priority topics including, for example, the teaching of public health, long-term home schooling, technology access and its alternatives, the role of parents, friendship and social interaction, learning outside the curriculum, the future of testing and evaluation, interruption as part of the academic calendar, job security for teachers and support staff, setting (and rethinking) curriculum priorities, special needs, student perspectives on the job of school, the importance of play, the psychology of group dynamics and social interaction, preparing for future rounds of a virus (or cyberattack or impact of climate change, etc.), college readiness, higher education transformed, the higher education promise in an economically challenged world, and more. Clearly, there is much to discuss; nearly all of it ranks high on the list of priorities for raising the world’s children.